What NOT to expect

What NOT to expect: Indeed our results are wonderful. Still it is beyond our possibilities to surpass given conditions. So this is the reason why this section is present.
Posted on4 Years ago by
What NOT to expect

Indeed our results are wonderful. Still it is beyond our possibilities to surpass given conditions. So this is the reason why this section is present.

Do not expect a completely flat, table top, finish. The new wooden floor will acquire more or less the shape of the sub-floor. If this is a flat and levelled one so the wooden floor will be, but as we all know the vast majority of sub-floors aren't flat, levelled and uniform.

A dust-free installation. Whilst we pay lots of effort in minimizing the amount of dust resulted especially from the cutting process you should have in mind that small valuable things, decorative or art pieces will feel much better out of the working area.

A single colour floor. Wood is a natural product. Species vary in the amount of their colour variation. Even the plainest species vary from piece to piece. Patterned floors show variation because of the way the light is shed when reflected from the grain as it runs in different directions. Hence, herringbone floors appear to be made from rows of light and dark wood.

Squeak free floors, of course, are achievable usually if the sub-floor is concrete or screed. If nailed down is required as a method of installation expect squeaks to develop in the trafficked areas. Also if the sub-floor is made of timber boards laid over joists squeaks may occur in time. Before laying any new wooden floor we have as mandatory stage to inspect the sub-floor and to screw all the loose boards or noisy ones.

Do not expect a floor without any open joints between the boards, or within the parquet pieces. A new floor may have tight closed joints but it will continue to absorb and release moisture with seasonal changes in humidity. It will expand and contract - even if imperceptibly. Open joints will appear in the finest of solid wood floors. Joints are more apparent in pale coloured or white finished floors. However, wide open joints greater than 1% of the width of the widest element adjacent to the joint are not usually acceptable - except where planned for effect.

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